Frequently Asked Questions

1.  WHO WILL BENEFIT THE MOST FROM THIS PRODUCT?

Patients who are presently estranged from using antiaging skin products because of cost or complexity will find this product amazing!

Patients “on the go”, since traveling with a single product eliminates the need for traveling with a series of products.

Those of you that presently do nothing to control and aging skin and need to start with something simple and easy that works!

 

2.  WHAT DOES UNITY™ NOT DO? 

It does not replace the moisturizer and sunscreen that most patients today are so familiar with. It does put all the anti-aging skin care products we need into one, simple, fast, and less expensive formula.

 

3. What does Vitamin A (Retinal) do for your skin?

You know the drill when it comes to caring for your skin: cleanse, tone, moisturize, apply sunscreen, and maybe try a few other treatments, like masks or anti-agers. Amid so many possibilities (and products) to help your skin looks its best, though, there are a few nutrients that skin really needs—and vitamin A is one of them. Whether you get it from your diet or in a topical cream, the protective and nourishing properties of A, and the nutrients your body uses to make it, lend a hand in keeping skin healthy, firm and radiant.

Unlike many other nutrients, vitamin A is a group of compounds that includes its active forms (retinal, retinal and retinoic acid) and other provitamin A carotenoids, like beta-carotene. Beta-carotene (and the other carotenoids) is the form of vitamin A that we get directly from the plant foods we eat. The pre-formed or active forms are found in animal foods. In our bodies, beta-carotene is converted into the retinal form of vitamin A.

 

4. Can I still go in the sun?

Yes

Using sunscreen shouldn’t be something you do only when you’re spending the day at the beach. It is a ritual most people need to make a part of their daily routine, especially if you live in warmer climates or spend a lot of time outdoors (time in the car counts). Yes, the sun’s warm rays can be restorative and comforting, but overexposure to ultraviolet light (both UVA and UVB rays) can lead to skin cancer and premature aging.

 

5. ONLY SOME PEOPLE NEED TO USE SUNSCREEN…RIGHT?

No—everyone needs sun protection, no exceptions. This includes people who have dark skin and who have no family history of skin cancer. Remember, you can’t feel or see a burn until after the fact, and skin can be damaged even without a visible burn.

 

6. DO ALL SUNSCREENS REDUCE MY RISK OF SKIN CANCER?

No. When it comes to protecting your skin, using any sunscreen is better than nothing at all. However, not all sunscreens offer the same benefits. That is why the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has ruled that a sunscreen’s label can only state that it helps prevent sunburn and reduces the risk of skin cancer (and early skin aging) if it has an SPF of 15 or higher and is broad spectrum, meaning it blocks both UVA and UVB light. Remember, these benefits only come with proper, consistent use, so be sure to read the instructions on any sunscreen before you apply.

 

7. BUT ISN’T IT TRUE THAT USING A HIGHER SPF SUNSCREEN GIVES ME BETTER PROTECTION?

Yes and no. An SPF 15 sunscreen filters about 93 percent of rays, whereas an SPF 30 filters 97 percent and an SPF 50 filters up to 98 percent. These small differences can mean a lot, particularly if you’re prone to burns. The American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) recommends using a sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher, but don’t bother searching for SPF 100. The FDA has no sufficient data to show that an SPF higher than 50 provides greater protection, which is why sunscreen labels may no longer tout a specific SPF above that number. Unfortunately, no product can actually shield you from 100 percent of the sun’s rays—which is why the use of the term “sunblock” is also prohibited.

 

8. DO I REALLY NEED TO PAY ATTENTION TO THE EXPIRATION DATE ON MY SUNSCREEN?

Yes. The active ingredients in sunscreen break down over time, and can become less effective at keeping you protected. Always check the expiration date on your sunscreen before using, and toss any bottle that is past its prime. Per the FDA, any sunscreen that does not have an expiration date stamped on its packaging has a shelf life of no more than three years, but keep in mind that higher temperatures can also cause sunscreen to break down. So, if you’ve been toting the same bottle back and forth to the beach for the past two summers, it’s probably a good idea to get a new one.

 

9. I’VE HEARD THAT CERTAIN INGREDIENTS IN SUNSCREEN CAN BE HARMFUL. SHOULD I WORRY ABOUT USING THEM?

There are two different types of sunscreen—physical sunscreens, which sit on top of the skin (think of the white zinc oxide lifeguards often use on their noses), and chemical sunscreens, which are absorbed into the skin. There has been talk that some chemical sunscreen ingredients may be dangerous—specifically that oxybenzone can interfere with hormone levels, and that retinyl palmitate may generate free radicals, contributing to cancer. According to the Skin Cancer Foundation, there is no scientific evidence that this is true for humans, and the ingredients remain approved by the FDA for the same reason. You can also opt for physical sunscreens and other barriers such as long-sleeve shirts, wide-brim hats and umbrellas.